Loop Ostomy

A loop Ostomy or Stoma is a stoma where both the upstream (proximal) and downstream (distal) openings of the bowel are brought out through the same hole in the abdominal wall.

The proximal opening of the stoma drains faeces from the intestine, while the other opening of the stoma (the mucous fistula) drains mucus from the lower part of the bowel that leads to the anus.

Loop stomas are normally used in either ileostomy or colostomy stomas, the size and shape are never the same from one person to another. A loop stoma can look just like an end stoma in some cases the distal opening of a loop stoma is very obvious, but in others it is attached very close to the skin making it difficult to see.

Depending on the amount of mucus that comes from the opening of the distal stoma it can affect and make it difficult to achieve and maintain a good pouching system seal.

A double-barrel stoma is where two distinct stomas are made and brought through the abdominal wall. The stomas can be either side by side or may be separated by a small area of skin. As with loop stomas, one is called the proximal stoma which the faeces come from, while the other is called the distal stoma and works as the mucous fistula.

With a Loop Stoma Depending on the surgeon and the type of surgery, there may be a support device used to hold the loop stoma in place while it heals. This is commonly referred to as a rod or bridge. This support device is temporary and can stay in place anywhere from 4 to 10 days, depending on the surgeon’s preferences and the healing process. It’s generally removed before going home and can be made of glass, rubber, or plastic